Tag Archive : Immigration Politics

/ Immigration Politics

Current US immigration policies mirror the shifts outlined by Catherine Dauvergne in her book “The New Politics of Immigration and the End of Settler Society.” Ms. Dauvergne is Dean and Law Professor at the Peter A. Allard School of Law at Canada’s University of British Columbia. Her literary works are based on her research work as a fellow of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, delving mainly on migration, refugee, Canada’s citizenship laws and policies, all in relation to the changing landscape of global migration.

As a citizen of a country that welcomes multicultural migration, it is worth mentioning that the politics governing Canada’s immigration policies stands in contrast to that of other major countries. The Canadian government considers its share of immigrants as significant, acknowledging their contributions in enhancing the prosperity of the country. At the same time, Canada encourages reuniting migrants with their family, and also offers refuge and protection to the unfortunates who have been displaced or persecuted in their countries of origin.

In citing the shifts in global migration politics mentioned by Ms.Dauvergne, we cannot help but relate the changes to the constantly evolving migration policies in the US. Where in previous administrations, the influx of immigrants was not a cause for concern, certain factors have brought on changes that altered immigrant status quo in the US soil.

Changes in Global Immigration Policies Outlined in “The New Politics of Immigration and the End of Settler Society.”

According to Ms. Dauvergne, her writing aims to point out the past and present as a way of providing a bigger picture on which to build forthcoming modifications in immigration regulations. Here, she refers to Australia, Canada, USA and New Zealand as “settler societies”, nations founded on large concentrations of immigrants that later called for the institution of migration regulations.

Asylum Seekers and the Global Asylum Crisis

The first shift occurred as a result of global asylum crisis. War and domestic conflicts in some countries had brought on asylum seekers to well-known “settler societies.” However, the constantly increasing number of asylum seekers had meant additional government spends, which more often than not, was not part of the government’s annual plans and appropriations.

The 9/11 Attacks and the Rise of Islamophobia

The September 11 attacks fueled anti-immigrant sentiments particularly for those coming from Islamic countries. As the US government asserted itself as still a major power to contend with, the so-called “War on Terror” was waged against Islamic countries suspected of harboring and/or conspiring with the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda.

In the US, heightened securitizations at airports and massive detention of Muslim immigrants rubbed off a sense of fear, or feelings of prejudice and hatred for Muslims in general, known as islamophobia.

End of Settler Societies and Loss of Multiculturalism

The events of the past, eventually led to the breakdown of multicultural ideology, in which every race making up a community is regarded as equals in terms of rights and opportunities. The policies that evolved thereafter became harsher, as in the case of those imposed by the Trump administration.

Ms. Dauvergne’s earlier observations turned out to be a foretelling of harsher immigration politics. As head of a country that was largely founded by immigrants, Donald Trump made clear his stance against multiculturalism; blaming immigrants for rises in criminality, loss of employment and acts of terrorism.