Tag Archive : Migration Policies

/ Migration Policies

It is quite ironic how widespread adoption of hardline anti-immigration policies gained major political support during the Age of Globalization.

Migration policies received little attention several decades after World War Ii in light of past racial actions taken by Hitler during his Nazi regime. However, growth in immigrant population that produced workers with similar and in some cases exceptional skills created perceptions of potential threats to the dominant group in terms of national identity, rights to welfare, and political influence. So much so that continuing increases spawned negative views and attitudes toward future acceptance of immigrants.

The 9/11 Attack added another aspect to the growing antipathy toward immigrants particularly to those coming from Middle Eastern nations. Muslim communities were being stereotyped as harborers, supporters or members of religious fanatics engaged in terrorist activities.

Moreover, negative sentiments received encouragement from major national leaders like Trump. The US president issued an executive order banning or restricting entry to the US, of Iranian, Libyan, Syrian, Yemen, Somalian and Venezuelan citizens.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison initiated a hardline stance against incoming refugees. German Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy were one in saying that the application of the principles of multiculturalism to a nation’s migration policy only spelled failure.

What is Multiculturalism and How is the Principle Applied to Migration Policies

The principle of multiculturalism believes that people from countries with differing cultures, religious beliefs, and linguistic backgrounds can exist peacefully in a country where there is general acceptance, tolerance and respect for every cultural or ethnic group. A multicultural country constitutes the natural born citizens as the dominant group and the different migrants as the minority group.

In applying the principle of multiculturalism, there should be laws protecting the rights of both the dominant group and that of each sub-cultural minority, especially in practicing their beliefs and traditions. It is also just for minority groups to expect equal recognition for their contributions to the country, and at the same time perform the same duties and responsibilities carried out by the dominant group.

The country on the other hand, must institute relevant and timely policies that will address any applications for citizenship that will absorb minority group members as naturalized citizens of the dominant group.